Tuesday, December 6, 2016

MISHMOUNTAIN WEBSITE LINK

MISHMOUNTAINS ORIGINALS UPDATE WEBSITE LINK.

NATIVE ART by MISHIBINIJIMA no longer produced since March of 2016, Native art vibrant and well in North America. 

Tuesday, November 8, 2011

MISHIBINIJIMA BIOGRAPHY

Mishibinijima, one of Canada's foremost artist, has created a unique body of work over the past four decades and established a loyal following in North America and overseas. He was born February 12, 1954 in Wikwemikong, Manitoulin Island and grew up immersed in the legends of the Ojibwe people. As a youth he was known as James Alexander Simon, but now he is widely recognized as MISHIBINIJIMA., practitioner of many diverse styles and media. Over the years he has been awarded many First Place and Best of Show prize at international art exhibitions. Currently, he serves as a judge and mentor for many North American juried art shows. He also develops curriculum materials for First Nations schools and continues to amaze art collectors with the detail and intricacy of his canvases.  
   From the 1970s to the present, Mishibinijima has explored many of the sacred places around Manitoulin Island and originated the sought after MISHMOUNTAIN series among others.
His uplifting philosophy has struck a chord with people who are seeking solace in the midst of tragedy and meaning in a world that us often confusing and frightening. The themes depicted in his paintings have universal appeal and speak to all who yearn for spiritual sustenance. In his works he underscores the wisdom of the Grandfather teachings as a way to foster respect and peace. He also emphasizes the interconnectedness of all life and calls upon all nations to preserve our natural surroundings for the benefit of our children - always, he urges us not to take the Earth for granted.
   Mishibinijima takes his role as an artist in society by courageously examining the difficult questions facing humanity. For example: he has meditated on the horrendous atrocities of the 9-11 attacks and the Holocaust on order to touch and articulate the ancient truths that have the power to save us all. For those who have yet to discover the metaphysical depths of Anishnabe culture. Mishibinijima offers timeless teachings and universal values to guide the people of the New Millennium into a positive future.

Thursday, May 29, 2008

Native American Art by E.C.LEWIS - Copyright .4.22.08

Western civilizations lies rooted in the medieval disciplines of Europe tied back to Egypt, Greece, and the Roman Empire, and developed to their fullness in the of the Renaissance Era. This period in the sixteenth century coincides with the European discovery of the America's, when the European feudal cities oraganized as powerful nation-states and the Christian Catholic Church has organized its influence of declared Christian values.

This peak of European influence met the civilizations of the America's and the pristine natural resources of two continents just five-hundred years ago. At the dawn of the twenty-first century, the post-colonial Eurpean influence faces practical challenges of survival and a stubborn superiority of ideas and beliefs that continues to dismiss the wisdom and traditions of those indigenous civilizations which evolved not in five or ten centuries but over millennia and remain rooted not to medieval Europe but to orientation upon the Earth, located within the web of the cosmological universe, with a sense of time oriented to the eternal.
Obstacles to comprehending this orientation lie in the deeply ingrained European concepts which include, for example: TIME, PROGRESS, PRIMITIVISM, PANTHEISM... which has become assumptions referred to and assumed to be collectively understood. To strip these concepts and theories to their medieval roots and examine them in comparison to the understanding of Native consciousness requires more knowledge than the Renaissance could provide. Modern anthropology defines civilization as the language, culture, and consciousness shared by a group of people. Native consciousness in this reference is the indigenous consciousness of North America although as Native North Americans tell us correctly, five hundred civilizations resided on the North American continent in the sixteenth century.
Within five hundred years, three important developments in European consciousness have soften hard core European beliefs: one is Galileo's truth that the earth is not the center of the universe; two is Darwin's theory that man is not unrelated to the Earth but dependant and developed upon it; and three is the Eastern sensibility of the direct and immediate experience of reality as in Zen Buddhism.
This knowledge equips western thought with the tools to probe its own assumptions and misconceptions and begin to correctly define English translations of Native concepts as the meaning is intended in a consciousness of metaphysical reality not as Aristotle defined it, but as in Oriental indigenous philosophy, which is much closer in meaning.
The terms PRIMITIVE, PRE-CIVILIZED, and PREHISTORY are European assumptions of societies existing before the records of written language in Europe and the Middle East. Oral societies are not illiterate-the Anishinabek of the Great Lakes have a written form of lanuage incised on sacred birch bark scrolls recopied continually into the records of the Great Medicine Society whose origins are so far back in time that the founder is simply referred to as "a young man." These symbols are also painted upon the Precambrian rock face of the Canadian Sheild in a method in which the pigment and rock are bonded inseparably. Indigenous societies are not primitive; they are primal.
To understand this compare the time line concept of human history and progress, which was invented by Augustine and accepted within European consciosness after the fourth century AD, and the consciousness that experiences time as infinity in a circular orientation of awareness with nothingness as its center. This orientation was not widely introduced to European academic thought until after WWII, with the American occupation of Japan and the 1959 invasion of Tibet, by China. But this experience of reality is close to Native consciousness and perception.
The fourth tool with which European thought may begin to comprehend Native awareness is the dawn of what has been referred to as the imformation age. The term Third World, which referred to civilizations which did not develop with the speed of the European concept of progress has developed into the term Fourth World, which refers to those indigenous civilizations which retained the knowledge avd perception distilled and cultivated within an ancestry that evolved over millennia of eras rather than centuries.
The voice of this indigenous knowledge surfaces at the height of the European concept of progress in an era in which this concept reaches the summit of its unprecedented capacity for destruction. The concept of progress derived from artificially imposed theories of linear human history is a major obstacle to understanding indigenous consciousness because it lies outside of a consciousness oriented to a circular experience of life and infinity.
The physical sciences, evolved from theories attributed most famously to Aristotle, quantified rather than qualified the Earth's elements. This scientific-rational experience of observation of the Earth misconstrues the qualifying consciousness of observation. Terms such as animism, pan-theism, totenism, and shamanism remain outside of th experience of European rationalistic terms of definition or meaning.
Animism is the quality within a natural element that transcends the sum of its physical parts. Therefore, when a human being of extreme sensitivity in Native culture is asked by a scientist educated in European rationalism if all the rocks on the beach are powerful, he is told that some are.
Pan-theism refers to the concepts of Greek cosmological thought before the development of philosophy and logic in western civilization but does not relate to the perceptive consciousness of Native North Americans in any conceivable way. Native consciousness experiences the non-duality of an intelligent universe devoid of an anthropomorphic personality. The finite phenomena which inhabit th Earth speaks to the reality of the infinite within the apparent thus penetrating the apperance to perceive the reality-which is unchanging.
Totenism is not the superstitious protection of an animal for a human being. By astute and prolonged observation it has been recognized that the clan of a human being is evident in human movement and manner. Those of a Bear Clan maneuverin a manner that differentiates itself from a member of a Fish Clan. Anyone can observe this when they are taught to see it. By prohibiting intermarriage within a clan, a civilization retains its optimum health.
Shamanisn, which utilizes animism and a mysticism oriented to the infinite and unchanging within the cosmological orientation of human beings upon the Earth, is the metaphysical realm of consciousness and perception akin to the Tantric in Buddhism. It is not a superstitious fear of the unknown but a fearless intervention of balance between human being and natural law. The path of spiritual development for a shaman in Native North American culture corresponds in discipline, sacrifice, and endurance to the term "warrior" within buddhist spiritual disciplines. The type of intervention referred to is within the realm of intervention practiced by those oriented to the Tibetan Book of the Dead, where the dying may be guided on their journey before the final breath is taken.
Native North American shamanism is communicated and developed by direct oral transmission as in Buddhist tradition, but differs in cultural expression, of course. The art and ritual of Native North American civilization share some similarities of consciousness and many cultural differences as well. What is important in the understanding for European styled societies when relating to Native North American societies is aptly expressed by Erich Fromm in his book The Sane Society:
"No sane society can be built upon the mixture of purely intellectual knowledge and almost complete absence of shared artistic experience....On the whole, our modern ritual is impoverished and does not fulfill man's need for collective art and ritual, even in the remotest sense, either as to quality or its quantitive significance in life....
"What are we to do? Can we invent rituals? Can one artificially create collective art? Of course not! But once one recognizes the need for them, once one begins to cultivate them, seeds will grow, and gifted people will come forth who will add new forms to old ones, and new talents will appear which would have gone unnoticed without such new orientation." (p.349-350).
Erich Fromm's evaluation for a sane society is already addressed in Native culture in North American. By correctly defining the terms we use to describe Native art and ritual, we are already supplying the means within the open door of art to perceive collectively and fulfilling the North American collective experience. Modern Native artists continue to communicate ancient Native consciousness. This consciousness is the expression of perception that penetrates the appearance of natural form to reveal the unchanging infinite. In the words of Native North Americans it is to see the Creator in Creation.
The Creator is not perceived as an anthropomorphic god but the permeating intelligence of the universe, deviod of human personality. This intelligence is seen to reveal itself not in prophets, written laws, or sacred writing but in the natural forms and natural balance of all creations, including man. Therefore, every leaf, rock, tree, river, bird, fish, animal, human, star, sun, moon, and planet are sacared. The Earth, and all that inhabits the Earth, is scared.
This metaphysical conscioueness is able to adapt to various history-based religions but the creeds of history-based religions may not easily expand to the consciousness that encompasses the orientation to infinity that traditional Native societies are culturally oriented to. The infinity in which the eternal is experienced in the moment that is now, is the sudden realization referred to in Zen Buddhism as enlightenment, and is the awakening produced within Native North American rituals. These rituals though known, cannot be explained in words; they must be experienced, just as meditation must be experienced , to be understood.
In this light it can be seen that the oral cultures of North America are not pre-civilized or primitive. Native societies are spiritual civilizations in the highest sense of the term civilization necessarily entails by European defination. Spiritual societies live in necessary simplicity. The collective sharing and specializations of Native North America pre-contact societies average a twenty-hour work week for it's memebers; this allowed the spiritual and cultural development of those traditions which Erich Fromm discribes as necessary for the sane societies and which modern purely rational society now require. It is our own assumptions which have blocked our understanding.
ART
The art of civilization is a respectful door to open to cultural awareness and expression. If we continue to assume that native culture has been lost or Native people have vanished, we make it impossibe to receive the gifts of those civilizations. To look back upon these civilizations and project a European rationalism is to mass a current message that Native artist are perfectly capable of giving meaning too.
Native North American consciousness has witnessed the arrival of European consciousness. Native consciousness has observed European rationalism and its value of intellect and merchandise for over five-hundrend years. The orientation to the infinite has endured the physical onslaught of immigration of millions upon millions of human beings into the geographical territories once inhabited only by Native people. Native North America culture has survived by remaining invisable: it has endured European concepts of ownership, history-base religion, policies such as Manifest Destiny, ingrained ideas of progress, and modern civilization resulting from industrailism. It has adapted in stages to resisit disease, warfare, assimilation, removal of cultural artifacts, removal of children from their families, and the removal of their ancestors for the graves.
The European rationalism continues its course we may observe it from the perspective of Native North Americans. The concept of progess which has led to water too poisoned to drink, land unfit for human habitation, and air that is too unhealthy to breathe, is the definition of insanity in Native culture. The element of fire has been intelligently manipulated to produce engines of transportation, manufacture, and destruction, which are impressive but reason would suggest caution and discipline in its use. While European rationalism wages current wars of ideologies, Indigenous populations pray for the healing of the Earth, especially the water which is the natural element with which to sustain life.
Human caution and discipline in the use of fire is developed in a consciousness that transends intelligence and awakens reason. Therfore a concept of ownership of divide portions of the Earth, which allows for the indiscriminate and manipulation of the Earth's resources to the detriment of the Earth's inhabitants, is not considered reasonable or intelligent in Native consciousness. It is not considered civilized for a fraction of the Earth's human population to consume or waste a majority of the Earth's resources. The natural balance observed in natural phenomena simply does not tolerate the imbalance of European rationalism.
The term scientific-civilization, applied to the twentieth century, stands outside of the understanding of balance. The duality of good and evil is transcended because good and evil is conceptual-dependant upon a point of view-while balance and imbalance are immediate referances with practical, non-conceptial influence and remain observable in every civilization of every era. Therefore laws of balance and imbalances sustain natural laws of the universe which remain infinate and absolute. The harmonize human conduct with the infinate laws of the universe is to develop a consciousness of extream sensitivity and adaptability that does not linger in realms of consciousness that entertain projections into the future to detriment of the immediate, exact reality of the now. This discipline of awareness may be referred to as Zen when applied to a Japanese form of Buddhism. It may be referred to as Shamanism, for lack of a better word in English, for developed Native North American consciousness.
The highly developed consciouness born of a specific culture does not automatically translate to every member of that culture, just as not all Catholic Christians are Catholic priests. Every Native North American is a Shaman or would communicate a transcendent level of developed consciousness. It is important to know that those who communicate on this level communciate within the symbols of their own culture. If the confines of European thought dismiss what it is not oriented to understand it perilizes the understanding of meaning for successive generations. European colonial concepts may have dismissed these tools for meaning but future generations of North American are likely to require them for basic survival.
Societies which are ancient are those which have endured. Their traditions are the purest of sciences in relation to themselves and the natural Earth. When the Buddha attained enlightenment under the Boddhi tree and was asked how he knew he was enlightened, he simply pointed to the Earth. It was the very Earth that bore witness to his enlightenment. As well, it is the very Earth to which ancient, traditional indigenous societies refer when communicating the transcendent consciousness that develops relightenment reason for human contuct. Simutltaneously, humn conduct in relation to the Earth. as ot rptates arpimd the sun, within a galaxy that is only one of many galaxies, has been understood before a telescope or spacecraft was invented.
The scientific inventions which the nineteenth century has invented so prolifically also relates to the European nineteenth century assumption that all consciousness relates to a tangible physical element. This conceptualization and finite limitation led Freud to attach human consiousness to a "libido." Twelieth century European thought allowed that consciousness can exisit without attachment to a physical element and now explores intelligence that permeates the universe unconfined to the human skull or differentiated molecules. This may be the cutting edge of western science but is the traditional reality of Native consciousness for millennia.
When modern Western civilization can allow for the possibility that the Native societies encountered in sixteeth century European exploration were mystic. enlightened, spiritual societies capable of absorbing, adapting , and resisting the European mercantile and consciously primitive poplations arriving in mass hoards upon their shores with beliefs and values alien to the natural laws of the natural universe, we may begin to open to the discipline of human conduct that must develop from within the balanced sanity of individuals before it can emanate into outward action. This is the discipline that traditional indigenous have cultivated for millennia with their civilizations.
In other words, traditional societies acknowledge that change is developed from within and coerced by outside force in forms of punishment or fear. This how traditional societies have resisted force assimilation. The mastery of psychology and humor is employed as a correcting influence on imbalanced behavior. The concept of reward and punishment either immediate or delay in terms of heaven and hell are not practiced. This method of reward may serve as a deterrent but it would not awaken the essential consciousness of an individual.
Traditional societies share - whether it is food. knowledge. resources, culture or territory. If they didn't share they would not have survived. This shared culture specializes area of work according to natural talent and skill. Specialization in western civilization means something quite different: specialization in traditional society reduces the average work week to twenty hours and leaves time to develop art, story telling, and ritual, which forms the basis for the type of human development largely devoid in the modern civilization of our time and which humanist such as Erich Fromm observe to be missing-and missed-by human beings. To open to the wisdom of traditional. indigenous cultures we simply observe the assumptions upon which modern society has developed and allow for the introduction of their meaning to be objectively defined.
This introduction is mot readily available through the universal language of art.Native art is no tprimitive, but primal. To separate Native artifacts for the cultures which have poduced them is defined as a form of genocide in the 1948 UN Declaration of Human Rights. For non-Native propulations it has removed meaning from the collective artifacts Moden Native art, produce within the enviroment of Native ulture, retains the meaning rooted within the ancient cultures.
By not expecting the symbolism and abstraction of Native art to conform to the developments of European Renaissance art, we can respect a parallel path of human development and lean to see, understand, and appreciate Native consciouness. The development of understanding the meaning opens our own human consciousness to a relationship to the Earth. The quantifying developments of scientific rationalism have disregarded the qualifying reasoning of indigenous culture. By opening to an understandig of the meaning inherent in the reason of indigenous culture, we open a door of humanism that the west has flirted with but not married into its consciousness.

Sunday, February 3, 2008

THE VOICE

The silent witness of the earth finds the voice of it's spirit in the painting of aboriginal, shamanic artist James Simon MISHIBINIJIMA , in a series of paintings titled the "Mountain Series" and "9-11." The earth as silent, sacred witness in the last voice to be heard in the aftermath of 9-11 and the ecological crisis. Art is a universal language but what is the universe theme? It is the voice that Aboriginal people have expressed for over five-hundred years as warning. It is the voice that was first introduced by Anishinabe painter Norval Morriseau, in 1962 in Toronto, and internationally in 1967, at the Montreal Expo. It is a voice expressed in symbol-a secret language of the Great Medicine Society of the Midewewin of the Anishinabek-and Morriseau broke all taboos of his culture when he broke these taboos and revealed it's images to the modern world.

Although we have learned to recognize the symbolic paintings of the Anishinabek, we have yet to understand the meaning. James Simon MISHIBINIJIMA of Manitoulin Island, leads us to this meaning and reveals the shamanic vision of Anishinabek symbolism as we face the ecological and post 9-11 uncertainly of Global proportion. It is time for the ancient meaning to be communicated to the modern world. Morriseau broke the taboos and James Simon MISHIBINIJIMA leads the way into the living meaning and vital awareness communicated in the symbols of shamanic perception.

MISHIBINIJIMA has painted these symbols in his studio for the past forty years. As a young student of the Woodland Art Studio influenced by Morriseau's break through, MISHIBINIJIMA has exhibited his prolific series of themes around the world from the Vatican, Rockefeller Center, Smithsonian, McMichael Gallery, Royal Ontairo Museum, the Colliseum and the Worlds Fair in Italy, the Moons House Art Galley in Germany, the Spirit of Sharing in Switzerland and Austria...... Now in his fifties, MISHIBINIJIMA returns full circle to Toronto, where the symbols of his culture were first revealed.

It is very important in the next millennium that man understands what he is doing to himself. For many generations the Native Elders have taught survival on Mother Earth with Harmony. Look at the Earth now, and it will remind man how far he's gone towards the path of destruction. These old teachings are written on stone and birchbark scrolls of the Anishinabek people. "If these old teachings are not available to you, just look around and see the animals, trees, water and sky. The answers occur all around us. This is how the Native people see the lands."- MISHIBINIJIMA

To observe in this way is to see the sacred and the shamanic. The "Mountain Series" penetrates the appearance of natural form to reveal the living spirit of a series of islands sacred to the Anishinabek people. The Anishinabek are the three nations of the Ojibwe ( Chippewa), Odawa ( Ottawa ), and Bodawatomie ( Pottawatomie ) with territories encompassing the Woodland areas surrounding the Great Lakes of North America.

This area was painted the Canadian artists known as the Group of Seven of Canada, in the early twentieth Century and based also in Toronto, Ontario. The group of Seven painted of the landscape by it's appearance in a post-impressionist style based upon European landscape art techniques. Mishibinijima paints the landscape in the ancient, symbolic language of the Medicine Society of his people whose beginning lies so far back in time that it founder is known as "a young man".

Comparison alone, within this perspective, is enough to create a revolution in the world of art. The exposure of ancient, sacred, secret meaning is an explosion. The "Mountain Series" reveals the shamanic perception of the shaman himself and indicates the source of this preception by placing a diamond into each canvass. Ancient tribal societies, which exist throughout the world have no financial value placed upon a diamond. What MISHIBINIJIMA expresses is the universal quality of a diamond. The flash of insight, the movement of penetration into the living spirit of the land consciously revealed, is the meaning of his diamond. What is seen in that moment is the living form revealing itself to the artist. Painting is the domain of shamans in Anishinabek society. It is the shamans who reveal in pictographs the living, breathing, communicating cosmology of the infinite universe in relation to the earth which gives birth to the recurring finite.
James Simon MISHIBINIJIMA reveals this universal shamanic awareness to reveal the caution our modern world has continually overlooked, judged as sentimental, or primitive: Mother Earth does not need man: Man needs Mother Earth. " Tribal societies are oriented to the cosmological; as modern societies erupt in violence or ecological unsustainability, ancient societies remain as witnesses to ancient teachings. These teachings realize that change must come from within. To look for rescue from without, in forms of religion, technology, or science, is to disregard the awareness cultivated within each living human being. This awareness-its, form, meaning purpose, and beauty, is the awareness communicated consciously and conscisely by James Simon MISHIBINIJIMA.

Tuesday, January 8, 2008

Pictographs And Their Meaning

Anishinabek Pictographs are the graphic symbols which communication vast meaning. A picture is worth a thousand words and pictographs use symbols derived from rock paintings and sacred birch bark scrolls, for these are the words which form the language of the Anishinabek people. The meaning communicated in pictographs is the deep consciousness of a perception that penetrates the mere appearance of form to expose the vital forces active within a form.
To perceive the earth as living and breathing: to perceive animal forces in conflict within a human being: to perceive an island anthropomorphized as a human form is to perceive with a shamanistic consciousness.
The pictographs, painted for hundreds of miles across the Canadian Shield and incised on sacred birch bark scrolls of the Great Medicine Society of the Anishinabek, are the repository of the religion, ethics and history of the Anishinabek People.
Within the Anishinabek culture, painting is the domain of shamans. Their talent is not to paint the appearance of form or the illusion of a third dimension as in western art.
Anishinabek art is a tradition of revealing the inner forces active within the living cosmos. This perception is not primitive: it rivals the findings of the most modern science by millennia. For example: Darwin created a revolution in intellectual thought with the theory that the human species is ..."not separated from, but a part of nature". (Roger Lewin, In The Age Of Mankind, Smithsonian Books 1988). His scientific basis for this idea is the close observation of the biological world. This observation defies the previous ideas of man as a unique creation in the universe or man as a rational being and therefore entirely separate from animals.
The Anishinabek observation of the natural world reveals some animal forces within human beings and also some human forces within each animal. The observation has been distilled over centuries and communicated graphically within the pictographs. The psychological, physical, emotional and spiritual dimensions within a natural form whether animate or inanimate are exposed in a language of symbolism.
This symbolism appears archetypal or primitive to western culture. But we must remember that western culture is a product of European ideas. Anishinabe pictographs reveal a profound insight into the natural world and human nature. Darwin's theory of man as a part of nature, which is closer to Anishinabe consciousness than the religious and philosophical beliefs in conflict with this theory, are a tremendous reversal in the belief system of western culture. Within Anishinabe culture, Darwin's theory does not go far enough or observe closely enough.
Freud has touched upon this animal force within human beings but Anishinabe perception identifies the type of animal and visually reveals these forces in their most dynamic expression-which is in conflict, or creation, or both. Jung, a student of Freud, developed dream interpretation to reveal these forces but Anishinabe observation developed a visual, graphic communication of these forces as well as a symbol of language to interpret and express them.
The language, legends and art of Anishinabe culture are communicated in pictographs that reveal profound meaning. Science recognizes language as crucial to the development of consciousness and culture. Consciousness is introspection and allows us to now what we know. Culture is the evolution crucial to human civilization-each generation benefits, distills and builds upon previous generations: Language communicates knowledge.
Anishinabe legends contain the religion, history and ethics of the Anishinabe people. They are the imagination of a cultural evolution that constantly develops and expands. As in all cultures man has been curious about the world in which he lives. Anishinabe legends are not mythology: they are the science of a culture conveyed in the language of symbols. The anthropologist Mary E. Southscott writes: "A very rich and flexible Anishinabe language makes possible the wealth of human values expressed by the legends. The legends, in their turn provide an inexhaustible mine for new graphic form which carries a message of it's own. Language, legend and art of create a circle of communication." (p.158, The Sound of the Drum: Boston Mills Press, Erin, Ontario, 1984).
The language of Anishinabe pictographs is in the details. The details convey the elements of meaning in which vast areas of the knowledge within the legend are illustrated. To understand the meaning within the pictograph, symbolic details are placed within a graphic form. This form is contained within a strong outline. Within this " form-line" of outward appearance, the dynamic hidden forces are illustrated in a style referred to as " X-Ray." Every detail of the X-ray communicates the story of a legend.
The legends contain the knowledge of a consciousness and culture that is beyond the familiar culture of the Industrial west, but communicates resonantly within each human being. Pictographs may appear to be simple, but the meaning conveyed is profound and complex.
Because we are conditioned by culture to understand meaning in terms of our own culture, pictographs can be disregarded or dismissed. To do this is to ignore the knowledge that is vital to our understanding. Consider the insights of ancient wisdom again in terms of science.
Cosmology and physics has discovered that the balance of oxygen and carbon nuclei within the universe must be so finely and precisely balanced to support life that they wonder if life itself wasn't designed into the creation of the universe. It is hard to imagine that life evolved as a coincidence or accident.
Anishinabe creation legends, like all other civilizations, consider these questions of vastness and meaning. For example: British physicist Paul Davies, asks this questions scientifically: " Could it be that living observers were written into the laws of physics, or is our presence in the world merely a highly improbable accident occasioned by a felicitous conjunction of numeral values adopted by the constants of nature? The answer, depends on one's philosophical, or even theological, turn of mind. (p.238, In The Age Of Mankind).
Anishinabe legends consider this question and tend to observe " living observers" and give them a name in the Anishinabe Language: "Manitou." The meaning in Manitou is no less complex or profound than the question posed by Davies. It is more simply stated by placing a small dot into the graphic form. The dot signifies: Manitou.
The meaning in Manitou takes many paragraphs to convey. First , the "dot" communicates that the creation of life , the earth, and the universe is not considered to be an accident. The " living observer " of Manitou is often translated as spirit, but this has confused Western culture into a mistaken assumption of pan-theism or superstition.
To understand the meaning of one dot in a pictograph, we look again to modern science for it's findings. Quantum physics and the frontiers of artificial intelligence have discovered that it is the arrangement of molecules-not the properties of the molecules themselves - that creates life, intelligence, and consciousness. This knowledge prompts Princeton physicist: Freeman Dyson, to state: " It makes sense to imagine life detached from flesh and blood and embodied in networks of superconducting circuitry." ( p. 243, In The Age Of Mankind ).
"Superconducting circuitry" is a much closer translation of Manitou and helps us to understand why Manitou is present in animate or inanimate form. Physicist Heinz Pagels, of Rockefeller University broadens our understanding of Manitou when he states: " The Universe it seems, has been finely tuned for our comfort, it's properties appears to be precisely conductive to intelligent life " (p.236, In the Age Of Mankind)."
Science defines Manitou as " Intelligent life" as closely as any one definition is able to come to so vast a meaning. The Anishinabe word "Gitchi" is translate into English as "Great". Gitchi Manitou is more closely understood in science than in western religion or philosophy. Scientist Author Roger Lewin writes: "The more scientists discern the physical laws that govern the state of the universe, the more these laws appear to have been established with human life 'in mind.' " (p. 237, In The Age of Mankind ).
" In mind" is the intelligent mind behind the intelligent universe: Gitchi Manitou. The meaning expands to more than human life and includes the creation of all life forms, including a living earth and breathing universe. This meaning helps us to understand why the earth is considered sacred. It is why Anishinabe legends caution human behavior in relation to how we treat Mother Earth.
This profound meaning is represented inside the form of a pictograph by a single dot. Imagine the meaning in a circle which Southcott tells us: " denotes, perfection, completeness and continuity. ( p.40, The Sound Of The Drum). The pictographs which form the basis of Anishinabe art, communicate the vast meaning and knowledge of Anishinabe culture and consciousness through the language and symbols which are ancient. The language is fluently spoken and graphically illustrated to this day.
If the creation of the universe is no accident: if intelligence is imbedded in animate and inanimate natural forms: if the cosmos is sacred - What are the universal ethics of the human being? Anthropologist Margaret Conkey of the University of California at Berkeley, addresses this survey of meaning of ancient pictographs: "You have to ask, what was the social context of the art that made it meaningful to the people who painted and used these images. What was in the lives of the artist that made these images meaningful? (p.150 In The Age Of Mankind). The question still applies to Anishinabe pictographs.
The Anishinabe pictographs are painted solely by shamans, which means contemporarily in Southcott's words: "They have a mandate from the Great Spirit to paint,... This spiritual motivation is unique. It is the strongest of all motivations" ( p.126. The Sound of the Drum). Because the ancient Anishinabe language is still fluently spoken, the pictographs answer the question of meaning and the questions asked by anthropologists, "... if we could speak ( the language), we would then know the world that our ancestors knew 50 millennia ago. "( p. 186, In The Age Of Mankind).
Language is considered by anthropologists to be essential to consciousness and culture. Plato's phrase "loom of Language" denotes language as necessary to the formation of culture. " So central is language to our humanity that a world without words is simply unimaginable. " (p.154, In The Age Of Mankind ).
Because the Anishinabe are one of the few Native North American tribes to have a written form of language that is fluently spoken, it is possible to reach what anthropology has given up on ever finding in Anishinabe pictographs: " An understanding of a psychological domain that is separate from our own and yet clearly identifiable with it." ( p. 154, In The Age Of Mankind ).
Anthropology is able to define the importance of language but has given up on being able to find it..."because, before the advent of writing a mere six-thousand years ago, human discourse simply vanished. "( p.180, In The Age Of Mankind). Anishinabe pictographs cannot be carbon dated because the pigment has become chemically bonded with the rock, but the symbols which form the mnemonic devices of Anishinabe language have never vanished and the meaning of these symbols is still retained. Believing that it is impossible to know the meaning of ancient art, anthropology has turned to measuring hominid brains or studying the tools and guessing at the meaning of ancient art objects. They hope to find clues to brain structures and the earliest evolution of the vocal tract for determining the origin of language. Anthropology may be unprepared for James Simon Mishibinijima's statement: "The symbols came first."
Lewin writes: "Turning from hominid remains of the tools and art objects these living beings left behind, we invoke the old proverb, 'by their works we shall know them.' The question is, how intimately small we know them? ( p. 184-85, In The Age Of Mankind). Anishinabe pictographs allow us to receive ancient wisdom true to ancient meaning. Science provides a universal understanding of the profoundness of this meaning even when it's tools are too limited to be able to decipher it. The Mathematician Jacob Bronowski has stated: " In reality science is neither a villain debasing human dignity nor the sole source of human wisdom." (p. 236, In The Age Of Mankind).
Even science faces a culture blindness. The "scientific civilization" as Bronowski characterizes the highly Renaissance influenced culture of the west, has for historically conditioned reasons overlooked the ancient wisdom of nature consciousness. All consciousness, science agrees, is embedded and developed through language. Language, consciousness, and culture provides the stimulus for ideas. The scientist William McLaughlin, of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California, states: "The real motive force behind the advance of the world has always been provided by ideas." ( p. 243, In The Age Of Mankind). The assimilation of Native children has always prohibited the use of their language.
Anishinabe civilization can contribute knowledge to the scientific civilization which developed intellectually at the same time that it explored new navigation routes and accidently discovered civilizations it was unprepared to understand. Scientific technology is even younger, with the rapid development that is largely a product of the industrial era. Within five hundred years, science and technology have developed an unintentional crisis of global proportion by overlooking the natural world.
The fragmentation of scientific proofs and products has guided the scientific civilization without benefit of knowledge provided by ancient wisdom concerning the biological earth. Lewin states: " But there is one great curiosity- a potentially fatal flaw in the drive for knowledge... Our scientific sights... have overlooked something obvious and important to us: namely, the rest of the biological world.... if the search for knowledge is our destiny, then we clearly have fallen badly short of fulfilling it with our biological heritage ( p. 246, In The Age Of Man). The heritage of Anishinabe consciousness is oriented to the biological, as well as a cosmological heritage.
In this way, the meaning of Anishinabe pictographs contributes knowledge to scientific frontiers. Lewin, states the importance: "Surely, as Francis Bacon urged, humankind must be an adventurous explorer, striving for new horizons as yet beyond our sight. But at the same time we must be aware of what we are in danger of losing through ignorance in the world we already know." (p.217, In The Age Of Mankind).
From anthropology, in which Conkey questions the meaning encoded in ancient pictographs and the lives of the artists who painted them, to the state-of-the-art questions of artificial intelligence, to the words of philosopher Daniel Dennett, of Tufts University: "Here we begin to ponder one of the most exacting of frontiers: What is mind? What is meaning? What is reasoning and rationality? (p.240, In The Age Of Mankind). Anishinabe civilization contributes meaning.
Ancient wisdom has avoided certain pit-falls in the duality that fragments modern scientific research. The quantifying formulas of Aristotle, formalized by Ptolemy and grounded in academic disciplines rooted in the European Middle Ages, has provided the basis of "progress" to the scientific civilization. As this civilization advances to from the Industrial Revolution to the " Information Revolution" as Mclaughlin names the period of change, the world is faced with an environmental crisis and the psychological ignorance of ancient wisdom.
The contribution of ancient wisdom remains encoded within the symbols, language and meaning of Anishinabe pictographs. In the words of science itself to explain this, the words of Princeton physicist Freedman Dyson, are borrowed: "This unimaginably great and diverse universe, in which we occupy one fragile bubble of air, is not destined to remain forever silent.... the expansion of life, moving out from earth into it's inheritance, is an even greater theme than expansion of England across the Atlantic. Such is the power of mind."(p.245, In The Age Of Mankind). Dyson is speaking of the physical laws of the universe which is also the heart of the meaning contained within Anishinabe pictography. All we have to do to find their meaning- is to ask the artists who continue to paint them.
Mishibinijima and E.C. Lewis - Copyright 2008

Monday, April 30, 2007

MISHIBINIJIMA INTERNATIONAL ART EXHIBITIONS

MISHIBINIJIMA ART GALLERY
432 Lake Shore Drive,
Wikwemikong, Ontario
Manitoulin Island. ,P0P 2J0
james.mishibinijima@gmail.com


Mishibinijima International Art Exhibition


2015
MISHIBINIJIMA  PRIVATE  ART  GALLERY
Viewings By Appointment.
GREAT LAKES CRUISE SHIP PASSENGERS #2  - Aug. 1-2, 2015

2014
GROUP of SEVEN and NORVAL MORRISSEAU'S SYMPOSIUM
Killarney, Ontario - August 30th , 2014
MISHMOUNTAIN  ART  EXHIBITION

MISHIBINIJIMA PRIVATE ART GALLERY
Viewings by Appointment
Twelve Mishmountain Murals by Mishibinijima
Curator: Mishibinijima
426 Lake Shore Road.
Wikwemikong, Ontario
P0P 2J0

2013
MISHIBINIJIMA PRIVATE ART GALLERY 
Native Art and Mishmountains by Mishibinijima
Curator: Mishibinijima
426 Lake Shore Road,
Wikwemikong, Ontario
P0P 2J0

2012
US - CANADA PEACE ARCH DUTY FREE SHOP SHOW ROOM
The Artworks of Mishibinijima
Curator: The Chorney's
255 Highway - 22 
Surrey, British Columbia
Canada

WOODLAND PRINTERS AND NATIVE ART GALLERY - 2011-2012 - on going exhibition
Mishibinijima's Mishmountains Murals
Curator: Jeremiah Duncan
16 Woodland Drive,
Serpent River First Nation
Cutler, Ontario
Canada

MISHIBINIJIMA PRIVATE ART GALLERY
Mishibinijima's Art Styles on Birch Bark - sold out
Curator - Mishibinijima
426 Lake Shore Road,
Wikwemikong, Ontario
Manitoulin Island, Canada

2011

MISHIBINIJIMA PRIVATE ART GALLERY
Grandfather Series on Birch Bark by Mishibinijima - sold out
Curator- Mishibinijima 
426 Lake Shore Road,
Wikweminkong, Ontario
Manitoulin Island, Canada
P0P 2J0 - viewing by appointment

WOODLAND PRINTERS AND NATIVE ART GALLERY
Mishmountains Mural Project by Mishibinijima,
Curator: Jeremiah Duncan
 16 Woodland Drive,
Serpent River First Nation,
P.O. # 7
Culter, Ontario

MISHIBINIJIMA PRIVATE ART GALLERY
Pictographs on Birch Bark - sold out
Viewing by appointment
426 Lake Shore Road,
Wikwemikong, Ontario
Manitoulin Island
P0P 2J0

2010

MISHIBINIJIMA PRIVATE ART GALLERY
Viewing by appointment
Thirteen Smaller Mishmountains on Canvas Art Exhibition
Curator: Mishibinijima
426 Lake Shore Road,
Wikwemikong, Ontario
Manitoulin Island, Canafa
P0P2Jo

2009

MISHIBINIJIMA PRIVATE ART GALLERY
Mishmountains by Mishibinijima - murals
Viewing by appointment
Curator: Mishibinijima
432 Lake Shore Road,
Wikwemikong, Ontario
Manitoulin Island, Canada
P0P 2J0

2008

OJIBWE CULTURAL FOUNDATION aka. O.C.F 
Group Art Exhibition
Curator: Mr. Allan Corbiere
West Bay,
Manitoulin, Ontario
P0P 1So

MISHIBINIJIMA ART GALLERY
Viewing by appointment and no interviews
"The Project" Diamonds and Murals
Curator: Mishibinijinma
426 Lake Shore Drive,
Wikwemikong, Ontario
Manitoulin Island, Canada

MISHIBINIJIMA ART GALLERY 
viewing by appointment
Pictographs on Stones ( sold out )
Curator: Mishibinijima
432 Lake Shore Drive,
Wikwemikong, Ontario
Manitoulin Island
Canada P0P 2J0

2007

Mahdezwin Art Gallery on Ashmun
Angel Series on Acid Free Paper
Curators: Lewis and Maracle
Sault Ste. Marie. Michigan
USA

Mishibinijima Private Art Gallery
Native Art by Mishibinijima on Birch Bark - sold out
Viewing by appointment
Curator: Mishibinijima
Wikwemikong, Ontario Canada

2006

Mishibinijima Private Art Gallery
Grandfather Series on Birch Bark - sold out
(By Appointment Only)
Curator: Mishibinijima
Wikwemikong, Ontario

Mahdezewin Art Gallery on Ashmun
Mishmountains by Mishibinijima
Curators: Maracle and Lewis
Sault Ste. Marie. Michigan
USA

Personal Invitation from ROME
Personal Invitation Pope John Paul II
To bring his likeness on canvas painted by Mishibinijima 
Vatican City, Rome
Italy

Maple Avenue Art Gallery,
Mishmountains by Mishibinijima
Curator:s Fawcett and Lewis
Evanston, Illinois
USA

University of Sudbury
Keng Education Institute - (Book Launch)
Illustrator: Mishibinijima
Sudbury, Ontario

Two Trees Convention Center
Niagara Falls, Ontario

2005

Mishibinijima Private Art Gallery
911 Tragedy Mishmountain Project
Curator: Mishibinijima
(By appointment Only )
Wikwemikong, Ontario

Mahdezewin Art Gallery on Ashmun
Native Art and Mishmountains by Mishibinijima
Curators: Maracle and Lewis
Sault Ste. Marie. Michigan

2003

Sanata Fe's Art at the Lafonda
Mishmountains by Mishibinijima
Curators: Lewis, Maracle, Mishibinijima
Santa Fe' ,New Mexico
USA

Mishibinijima Art Gallery
Wikwemikong Art Gallery, Canada

2003

Eiteljorg Museum of the Native American Jury Art Show
Mishmountains - Two Awards
First Place and Best of Show
Curator: Richard Lewis and Maggie Maracle
Indianapolis, IN. USA

2002

Ziibiwing Cultural Society Jury Art Exhibition
Mishmountains - Two Awards
First Place and Best of Show
Curators: Mr. Richard Lewis and Maggie Maracle
Mount Pleasant, MI. USA

2001

Baymills Community College,USA
Pictographs and Native Art by Mishibinijima
Curators: Richard Lewis and Maggie Maracle
BAYMILLS, Michigan. USA

Lake State University
Host: Mishmountains by Mishibinijima
Curator: Mr.Richard Lewis
Sault Ste. Marie, MI.USA

Mahdezewin Art Gallery
Mishmountains by Mishibinijima
Curators: Maracle - Lewis
Sault Ste. Marie, MI.USA

1999

Spirit Landscapes by Mishibinijima (By invitation only).
Mishmoubtains by Mishibinijima
Pickering, Ontario

1998

Mishibinijima Art Gallery
Wikwemikong, Ontario

Moon House Art Gallery
Symbols by Mishibinijima on Canvas
Verdun, Germany

Skydome POW WOW
Fine Art Publishing by Mishibinijima Exhibition
Toronto. Canada

1997

Moon House Art Gallery
Book Launch of Mishibinijima's Symbol Book
Verdun Germany

Mishibinijima Art Gallery
Pictographs of Birch Bark - sold out
Curator: Mishibinijima
Wikwemikong, Ontario

MOON HOUSE ART GALLERY
Native Art, Symbolism and Mishmountains by Mishibinijima
Sponsored for Private and Corporate Clientele only
Cologne, Germany

NATIVE AMERICAN HERITAGE SYMPOSIUM
Curator: MOON HOUSE ART GALLERY
Hamburg, Germany.

MOON HOUSE ART GALLERY
Native Art, Symbolisms and Mishmountains by MISHIBINIJIMA
Sponsored for Corporate and Clientele Only
Cologne, Germany


MOON HOUSE ART GALLERY Mishibinijima
Native Art, Symbolism and Mishmountains by Mishibinijima
Verdun, Germany

WOLF DEN ART GALLERY
Native Art, Symbolism and Mishmountains by MISHIBINIJIMA
Gallery Partnerships
Munich, Germany

1996

Mishibinijima Art Gallery
MISHMOUNTAINS and NATIVE ART by MISHIBINIJIMA
Curator: Mishibinijima
Wikwemikong, Ontario

Moon House Art Gallery
Mishmountains, Symbolims and Native Art by Mishibinijima
Verdun, Germany

1995

Mishibinijima Art Gallery
Pictographs on Limestone Slabs - sold out
Curator: Mishibinijima
Wikwemikong, Ontario

BEAR'S DEN ART GALLERY
Mishmountains and Pictographic Symbolism
Munich, Germany

Emerson Art Gallery
Native American Culture from the WOODLANDS
Clinton, New York, USA

1994

Sudbury Friendship Center
Support of Craft Shop Art Exhibition
Sudbury, Ontario

Mishibinijima Art Gallery
POWER STONES and PICTOGRAHS - sold out
Curator: Mishibinijima
Wikwemikong, Ontario

Tom Thomson Art Gallery
Group Art Exhibition: Sacred Places
Owen Sound, Ontario

1993

Mishibinijima Art Gallery
Miniature Native Art - sold out
Curator: Mishibinijima
Wikwemikong, Ontario Canada

1992

Vatican Presentation
Painting Titled: Togetherness, Presentation to Pope John Paul II
Presenter: Bishop Jean Louis Plouffe
Vatican City, Rome
Italy

Mishibinijima Art Gallery
( Grand opening )
Wikwemikong, Art Gallery

Ottawa Winterlude
Curator: Winterlude Organization
Ottawa, Ontario

Lepriete Art Gallery
Meanings of COLUMBUS DAY
Art Exhibition of Manitoulin
Toronto, Ontario

Wikwemikong Art's Festival
Wikwemikong Heritage Days
Wikwemikong, Ontario

1991

Mishibinijima Art Gallery
Grand Opening of Mishibinijima Art Gallery
Wikwemikong, Ontario

Wikwemikong Arts Festival
Wikwemikong Heritage Days Annul Festival
Wikwemikong, Ontario

1990

Tundra Art Gallery
Curator: THE GORDON'S
Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario

Mishibinijima Private Art Gallery
Wikwemikong, Ontario

1989

Toronto Arts Festival
Gathering of First Nations
Event Organizers: Catherine and Ron ROBERTS
Toronto, Canada

Wikwemikong Arts Festival
Wikwemikong Heritage Days
Wikwemikong, Ontario

The Hugh McMillian Hospital
Fund Raising Group Art Exhibition
Toronto, Canada

Sudbury Friendship Center
Establishment of Art's and Craft Store
Sudbury, Ontario.

1988

Ojibwe Cultural Foundation
MISHMOUNTAINS by MISHIBINIJIMA
Curator: Kate and Mishibinijima
West Bay, Ontario

Native Art in View
Sponsor: Dr. Bernard CINADER
Paris, France

Indian Arts and Craft Exhibition
Curators: Catherine Cornilius and Ron Roberts
Bloor and Yonge,
Toronto, Canada

Ottawa Winterlude
Curators: Winterlude Organization
Ottawa, Ontario

1987

Etobicoke City Hall
Curators: Etobicoke Heritage Department,
Etobicoke, Ontario

Mishibinijima Private Art Gallery
Power Stones and Totem Poles Art exhibition - Sold Out
Curator: Mishibinijima
Wikwemikong, Ontario

1986

Wigwan Art Gallery
Meet the artist to Wigel's Art Collection
Curator: George and Charlotte WIGEL
Manitoulin Island, Canada

1985

Lampton County Art Exhibition
Curator: Lampton Board of Education
Sarina, Ontario

Tundra Art Gallery
Curator: The GORDON'S
Native Art and MISHMOUNTAINS by MISHIBINIJIMA
Sault Ste. Marie. Ontario

University of Toronto
Curator: Dr. Bernard CINADER
Medical Science's Building
Toronto, Ontario

Thunder Bay Art Gallery
The Band Donation - WOODLAND ART
Thunder Bay, Ontario

Ojibwe Cultural Foundation
MISHMOUNTAINS by MISHIBINIJIMA
Curators: Mishibinijima and FOX
West Bay, Ontario

Art Gala
Curator: Rose McGuinnis
Toronto, Ontario
( Very very bad experience )

1984

Tundra Art Gallery
THE BURKS and THE GORDON'S
Invites: Mishmountains by MISHIBINIJIMA
Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario

TRAVELING ART EXHIBITION
Dr. Bernard CINADER
         from the
University of Toronto,
Medical Sciences Building
Traveling Art Exhibition

Sharing the Art in VIENNA
Vienna. Austria

Sharing the Art in MUNICH
Munich, Germany

Sharing the Art in Buffalo, New York
Buffalo, New York

Sharing the Art Oakville, Ontario
Oakville, Ontario

Ontario Art Gallery
Curator: Dr. Bernard CINADER
Toronto, Ontario

Birch Bark Sings
Curator: Dr. Bernard CINADER
Oakville, Ontario

Thunder Bay Art Gallery
Art Collector Helen Band Donates Art Collection
Thunder Bay, Ontario

1983

Whetungs Art Gallery
Mr. Cliff WHETUNG
Peterborough, Ontario

Miniature Art by Mishibinijima
(University Professor buys complete art collection)
University of Marburg,
Marburg Germany

1882

Walter Engel Art Gallery
SPIRIT MOUNTAINS by MISHIBINIJIMA
On Bathurst
Toronto, Ontario

1981

Yost Art Gallery
Mr. George YOST - Manager
Summerset and Yonge Street,
Toronto, Ontario

1981

Yost Art Gallery
Mr. George YOST - Manager
Summerset and Yonge Street,
Toronto, Ontario

1980

Wikwemikong Band Council Complex - Grand Opening
Wikwemikong, Ontario
Manitoulin Island
Canada

McMichael Art Gallery
THE WOODLAND ART 
(Permanent art collection)
Invitation by Robert McMichael
Klienburg, Ontario

Ontario Science Center
Woodland Art from Manitoulin
Sponsored by International Nickel Company. INCO 
Toronto, Ontario

Turtle Art Gallery
Mishmountains by MISHIBINIJIMA
Buffalo, New York

The Sound of the Drum
Book Launch at Toronto's Harbor Front
Author: Miss. Beth Southcott
Toronto, Ontario

1979

Royal Ontario Museum
Group Art Exhibition from MANITOULIN
Curator: Mr. Basil Johnson
Toronto, Ontario

Rainbow Art Camp
Artist Retreat on McGregor Bay's Rainbow Lodge,
Curator: Miss Marylou FOX - CEO 
Birch Island, Ontario

Ottawa  Museum  of  Man
Group Art Exhibit on Native Art 
Ottawa, Ontario

Art at the Coliseum
Native Art and Culture at the Coliseum
Curator: Miss Marylou FOX
Rome, Italy

International  Worlds  Fair
(Best of Show at the Worlds Fair) - BARI, ITALY
( Native Culture from Canada) Coliseum Park, ROME, ITALY
Curators and Representatives: Ms. Marylou FOX and MISHIBINIJIMA

1978

Ojibwe  Cultural  Foundation
Group Art Exhibition of Manitoulin Artist
Curator - Ms. Marylou FOX - CEO
West Bay, Ontario

Rainbow  Art  Camp
Manitoulin Artist Retreat - Curator: Miss Marylou FOX - CEO
McGregor Bay's Rainbow Lodge
Birch Island, Ontario

Native  Cultural  Art  Exhibition
MISHMOUNTAINS by MISHIBINIJIMA
Curators: Catherine CORNILIUS and Ron ROBERTS
Bloor and Yonge Street,
Toronto, Ontario

1977

Royal  Ontario  Museum
Miniature Art on Paper by MISHIBINIJIMA
Curator: Basil JOHNSON 
Toronto, Ontario

Artisan  Art  Gallery
MISHMOUNTAINS by MISHIBINIJIMA
Mr. George YOST - Artist Manager
Front and Yonge Street,
Toronto, Ontario

Walter  Engel  Art  Gallery
Native Miniature Art by MISHIBINIJIMA
On Bathurst,
Toronto, Ontario

1975

Yost  Art  Gallery
Mr. George YOST - Manager
Summerset and Yonge Street
Toronto, Ontario

Ojibwe  Cultural  Foundation
Mishmountains by MISHIBINIJIMA
Curator: Miss Marylou FOX - CEO
West Bay, Ontario

1974

Ojibwe  Cultural  Foundation
Mishmountains by MISHIBINIJIMA
Curator: Miss Marylou FOX - CEO
West Bay, Ontario

Walter  Engel  Art  Gallery
Mishmountains Art Exhibition - SOLO
On Bathurst
Toronto, Ontario

1973

Yost  Art  Gallery
Mr. George YOST - Manager
Summerset and Yonge Street.
Toronto, Ontario

Rainbow  Art  Camp
Manitoulin Artist Rainbow Lodge Retreat
OCF Project Curator: Miss Marylou FOX
McGregor Bay, Ontario

1971

Ojibwe  Cultural  Foundation
Group Art Exhibition Showcasing Manitoulin Artist
Curator: Ms. Marylou FOX - CEO
West Bay, Ontario

Yost  Art  Gallery
Mr. George YOST - Manager
Summerset and Yonge Street,
Toronto, Ontario

1970

Manitoulin  Secondary  School
Final Art Exhibition of Manitoulin Art Club
West Bay, Ontario

Ojibwe  Cultural  Foundation
Group Art Exhibition of Manitoulin Artist
Curator Miss. Marylou FOX - CEO
West Bay, Ontario

1969

Manitoulin Secondary School  -  Manitoulin Art Club
West Bay, Ontario

Ojibwe  Cultural  Foundation
Group Art Exhibit of Up and coming artist of Manitoulin 
Curator - Miss, Marylou FOX - CEO
West Bay, Ontario

Ojibwe  Arts  Festival
Fall Exhibit of Up and Coming Artist
Curator - Miss Marylou FOX - CEO
West Bay, Ontario